Site Preparation

Site preparation is the first phase of construction-related activity for a structure. Site preparation involves the demolition or wrecking of buildings and other structures, clearing of building sites and sale of materials from demolished structures. Site preparation also entails blasting, test drilling, landfill, leveling, earth-moving, excavating, land drainage and other land preparation. Also included are tunneling, overburden removal and other development and preparation.

Excavation & Grading

Earth excavation and grading can be a fascinating part of a construction project. The powerful heavy equipment, used to best advantage by a skilled operator, is a joy to behold. The scope of the excavation job varies from digging footings for a small building to moving millions of cubic yards of earth. The one thing all excavation jobs have in common, though, is that careful planning is the key to success.

Excavation is often used as a broad term which includes cut (or excavation) and fill (or embankment). Cut is defined as removing material to lower the elevation of an area. Fill is defined as placing material to raise the elevation of an area. Another common breakdown in excavation work is bulk excavation and trench excavation.

Directional boring

Directional boring, commonly called horizontal directional drilling or HDD, is a steerable trenchless method of installing underground pipes, conduits and cables in a shallow arc along a prescribed bore path by using a surface-launched drilling rig, with minimal impact on the surrounding area.

Directional boring is used when trenching or excavating is not practical. It is suitable for a variety of soil conditions and jobs including road, landscape and river crossings. Pipes can be made of materials such as PVC, polyethylene, polypropylene, Ductile iron, and steel.

Septic Systems

Households that are not served by public sewers usually depend on septic systems to treat and dispose of wastewater. Septic systems represent a significant financial investment. If cared for properly, a well designed, installed, and maintained system will provide years of reliable, low-cost service.

A failing system can become a source of pollution and public health concern, causing property damage, ground and surface water pollution (such as well water—both yours and your neighbors), and disease outbreaks. Once your septic system fails to operate effectively, you may need to replace it, costing you thousands of dollars. Plus, if you sell your home, your septic system must be in good working order.